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Donor Management: Tools to Segment & Personalize Mailing List

givecentral donor management tools

In the family of donor management tools that non-profit associations should use, the most important one would enable “personalized communication” based on the “segmentation” of its audience.

Each customer is unique, so why would you want reach them with the single approach?

It is a question of not sending a single letter to tens or hundreds of people who have little in common – It is a matter of grouping its recipient donors and personalizing its message for each group (the individualization of the message being the most advanced level).

One of the oldest and best techniques for segmenting a database is the RFM (Recency, Frequency, and Amount) analysis. RFM analysis is simple because it does not require complex statistical analysis or detailed demographic profiles.

If non-profit associations have their donor’s giving history in their database, then they can do an RFM analysis. This analysis is said to be a powerful donor management tool because it brings together three of the best indicators of a donor’s interest in the cause.

In other words they can be classified in the following five groups:

  1. New donors (have just made their first donation)
  2. (Less than one year old)
  3. Old donors (have given before a year)
  4. Regular donors (those who give regularly, for example by monthly contributors)
  5. The donors by giving levels (those who give via a group, once a certain threshold is reached)

Other popular methods of segmentation non-profit associations can use are:

Segmentation by Geographic territories

E-mail delivery by geographic location can provide you with a significant advantage. Spending time segmenting your donors by region, department or city can help you personalize your events and appeals for these donors.

Segmentation by Age/Sex

Email marketing can also be tailored to the age and gender of your donors. The tone of the content, the images used, and even the kind of charity events themselves, can give better results if they target a more specific audience. By establishing alternative advertising methods based on these two demographic criteria, companies can attract a wider audience without too much effort.

Non-Profit Communications: 4 Steps to Creating a Social Media Content Strategy.

Non-Profit Communications

Creating a non-profit communication strategy on social media is never easy. Generally with relatively small funds, non-profit organizations struggle even harder in this exercise. So we decided to set up this short guide with 4 steps to help you orient your strategy while preserving your wallet at best. These few tips will help you improve your visibility and the weight of your website on the World Wide Web.

The goal of this non-profit communication strategy is to stir the crowds and raise more funds to carry out your activities.

1.    Know your audience

It is important to know who you are addressing.Which age group is most sensitive to your cause?What are the interests of your audience?Adapt your content accordingly: Experiment, take risks!Note that while this year has seen the growth of smartphones (207.1 million in the US in 2016), 2017 will only amplify the trend.Perhaps you could orient your strategy towards new platforms?For example, WWF recently used Snapchat and its famous countdown to defend the urgency of protecting species threatened by human activities.

2.    Build strategic partnerships

Make sure that people talk about you. Contact bloggers, journalists and other influencers to talk about your cause! Why not ask celebrities to lend you their voice? You can also take advantage of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR is a “concept in which companies integrate social, environmental and economic concerns in their activities and in their interactions with their stakeholders on a voluntary basis”. A 50/50 situation that allows you to benefit from an expanded network and gives your partner the status of defender while allowing him to meet the standards of CSR is a great non-profit communication strategy to instantly reach target audience.

3.    Create a Buzz around your cause

You do not have an unlimited budget? It does not matter. It is always possible to create a buzz with good ideas when one is well informed. Social Media audience tend to react better with content that is either shocking or funny. Unicef ​​Sweden decided to shock its audience in April 2013 by launching a campaign entitled “LIKES DO NOT SAVE LIVES”. A smart campaign smartly conducted for guaranteed success.

A good non-profit communications campaign cannot be improvised. Study the trends and discover the conversations and interests of internet users to strike the right chord. In order to save time and maximize your efficiency, do not hesitate to use a good monitoring tool or donor management tool. You will have the keys to master the core of your social media communication strategy with insights gained on donor behavior.

4.    Reward the Commitment

Last but not least, listen to the reactions that your engagement brings.The era 2.0 is also an era of reputation.By becoming a recognized organization, you become an influential voice.A simple thank you, personified and addressed directly to the internet users who interact with you means a lot.That said, you will also attract the engagement of your interlocutors, offering a little more visibility to your organization.

The goal of this guide, a better non-profit communication strategy for social media is to help you multiply the commitment to your organization.Target your audience, build quality partnerships, produce content that can be shared virally, and reward users who interact with you.

market research nonoprofit association

Market Research for your Non-Profit Association~the 7 Golden Rules.

Before you start a major marketing campaign for your non-profit association or plan to introduce a new product or service, you need to be sure that your donors want what you are offering. Imagine working hard on a new service for months only to find out that your audience just isn’t ready for it!

Research surveys can help you find the interests of your community, provide a thorough understanding of your existing business and also help explore new opportunities in the marketplace.

Conducting a survey however, can be more difficult than it seems. At least for quality results.

Here are some tips from us at GiveCentral to help you get started.

Set up a survey to probe your non-profit association’s community with these 7 golden rules.

1.     Before getting started ask yourself

The survey must be specific to a target because its nature and the conclusions to be drawn will depend greatly on the target. You can survey your volunteers or employees to make improvements within the organization.

You can also know the satisfaction of your donors and the prospects of their growth.

  • What question are you trying to answer?

Write the problem to which this survey responds. Poll Rule: A survey always answers a question.

2.       How to structure it?

Some tips to increase your response rate:

  • Choose your non-profit survey title and subtitle
  • Consider adding a description where you set the context, explain the issues involved in the survey and why it is important that they complete the survey
  • Give an end date to the survey, and put it forward so as to avoid procrastination. It’s now or never!
  • Start with broad questions and get into the details as you go.

3.      What kind of questions to ask?

Questions should be short. Between 5 and 15 words. The respondent does not want to spend too much time taking questions. Answering your survey should be easy and quick.

Questions must be clear. Use simple and appropriate vocabulary. Even if the questionnaire is aimed at professionals, avoid the use of jargons.

Questions must be relevant. Stick to a subject. The respondent must understand why you are asking a particular question.

Also be careful not to ask personal questions. Even if your survey is anonymous, you would lose in response rate.

4.     What kind of survey response options to use?

There are two formats you can choose from- structured (where the respondent is allowed to select a response from pre-existing choices) or unstructured (open-ended) response formats.

While the structured formats are used for greater efficiency and ease, the unstructured survey response formats are a more popular choice for qualitative research.

Some advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used survey formats for market research are:

Single choice closed question

+ Fast and simple

– Limit

Closed multiple choice question

+ More open but still easy to strip

– Some proposals are sometimes chosen without real conviction

Ranking

+ Allows accurate comparisons and results

– Difficult to put in place

Open question

+ Leave a Reply

– Long to answer: may scare the respondent (be sure to leave the answer optional)

– Little response rate

– Long to strip

5.      Who will be your target audience?

Sample and population

  • The population is the number of people who make up the group you want to interview.

For example, if you want to better understand the behaviour of your donors, your population is the number of donors your non-profit association has: 150 for example.

  • The sample is the number of people in this population who responded to your survey.

You send your survey by email to your 150 donors. Only 50 respond: this is the size of your sample.

How large should my sample be compared to my population?

The table below shows you the size of the sample you need to get meaningful results.

Market Research for your Non-Profit Association- the 7 golden rules

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.surveymonkey.com/mp/sample-size/

Thus, it can be seen that the larger the size of the population, the less the proportion of respondents to be interviewed.

When is a sample representative of my population?

A margin of error of 5% and a confidence level of 95% according to the sample size shown above guarantees good reliability and very significant results.

6.     How to administer the non-profit survey?

There are multiple ways to administer a survey depending on the size of the population and the number of questions you may wish to ask. Each method has its pros and cons.

Face to face:

+ Helps if the questionnaire is complex / long

+ High response rate

– Costly and long

– Long analysis

By email:

Send a questionnaire + a cover letter + return envelope or propose a return by hand

+ Accessible to all: can reach all our members without exception

– Low response rate

– Expensive

– Long analysis

Online survey:

Put your non-profit online survey on the website, and send an invitation to reply by email. You can use solutions like Google Form, Survey Monkey and GiveCentral’s donor management system.

+ Automatic scoring

+ Anonymity of responses if desired

+ Allows some tools to have a graphical view of the results

– Need to have internet to answer: discriminating (less and less however)

The people who respond to the surveys must be randomly selected if our population is to be represented. Be careful, therefore, that administering your online survey does not distort the results. There is a risk of missing out on the representation of elderly people without internet access, those who rarely consult their emails or rarely visit your website.

7.     What to do with the results?

The analysis of the results is an essential step.

The results must make it possible to answer your initial questions and put in place concrete actions.

Be sure to remain objective in your analysis, because some answers can be misinterpreted. To remedy this, you can work with several hypothesis.

It is important to communicate the results of your non-profit survey to the community.

People who have taken time to answer your questionnaire will be delighted to have this information. Your non-profit association can use various communication tools such as, the website, monthly newsletter or email.

Motivational concept image of a hand holding marker and write We Want To Hear From You isolated on white

GiveCentral Launches Predictions for Nonprofit Giving Survey

As a leading online giving provider, GiveCentral is committed to advancing industry research to help identify and understand emerging trends and challenges in the nonprofit community.  As such, bi-annually, we conduct a national nonprofit giving survey for professionals to gain insights on the state of giving.

We’ve launched the much-anticipated 2017 Predictions for Nonprofit Giving survey and would like to hear your opinions and insights.  As leaders in the nonprofit fundraising industry, we know you have your fingers on the pulse of giving trends. From giving preferences and levels to the increasing role technology plays in donations, your thoughts and feedback matter.  Would you help us by taking a quick survey?  

Click here to take the survey

With your help, the third edition of the GiveCentral Predictions for Nonprofit Giving Survey Report will once again reveal valuable insights on the state of giving while offering practical advice and best practice suggestions to ensure your ongoing fundraising success.  

Thank you for playing a role in this important initiative.  All survey participants will receive a copy of the final report.  Your time and participation are much appreciated.

Here’s to a successful 2017!

charitable giving by religion

The #GivingTuesday Countdown

#GivingTuesday

– the global philanthropic movement celebrating and encouraging a national day of charitable giving – is one week away.  How are you celebrating it this year?  

Ideally, your planning is in the final “finishing touches” stage with your communications ready to roll and your online/mobile giving site ready to accept donations.  For some, however, we know that despite the best intentions your #GivingTuesday plans may still be in the works.  

With that in mind, we developed this quick-and-easy last minute #GivingTuesday Checklist to help you capitalize on this big day of giving and pull together a successful #GivingTuesday campaign:

  • Determine Your Campaign Theme and Goal

The first step is to figure out what you are raising money for and how much you aim to raise.  To make things easy, if you already have a holiday or end-of-year campaign in place, simply tie #GivingTuesday to that campaign.  It’s a great way to bolster the campaign and increase support.

If not, create a specific campaign goal that will resonate with your supporters.  Donors want to know what their donations support so be specific – i.e. raising $50,000 for a scholarship fund or $10,000 for sprucing up a local family shelter.  You may even want to consider taking a menu approach:  allowing donors to direct funds to multiple ongoing projects you  support.  

  • Craft Your Communications.

Compelling communications are the backbone of your #GivingTuesday fundraising campaign.  Donors are more likely to give if they know how their dollars help.  Be sure to craft stories that demonstrate the impact donations have on your campaign.  Use strong visuals to help bring your story to life and be sure to make it easy to give by including a link to your online giving page in every communication.  Your communications need to inspire and breakthrough the clutter of the day.  

Time won’t allow for a full donation page overhaul, but at the very least make sure your donation page references your #GivingTuesday effort and the donation options mirror your campaign.  And, be sure to add the highly recognizable #GivingTuesday logo to your page.   

  • Get Social

#GivingTuesday expertly leverages social media to encourage giving.  Be sure you create social content that is not only compelling but easily sharable.  Invite your supporters to share your story – and link!  

You can still make the most of #GivingTuesday but you have to act fast!  Happy fundraising.    

alumni giving

Homecoming: A Great Time to Connect for Alumni Giving

This fall many schools and parishes are hosting homecoming festivities which are a fun way for students, parents and parishioners to show their parish pride!  As the name implies, homecoming is also a time to invite former students and parish members back to campus to keep them connected to you and your mission.

If you haven’t done so already, now’s the time to share details about your upcoming homecoming.  Alumni are an important constituent who can help you advance your mission.  Keeping them engaged in your organization can have significant payoff in the long run which is why they should already be part of your fundraising strategy playbook.

Here’s a quick game plan to help you tackle this initiative during homecoming:

  • Create a special invite for alumni encouraging them to come back for homecoming festivities.  Distribute via traditional channels (bulletin, flyers at local establishments, local newspaper, email if you have that info, etc.) as well as socially on popular social sites.
  • If you haven’t done so already, create an alumni Facebook group and include details on how to join the group in your homecoming alumni invite.  You can use this group as a way to publicize homecoming events and so much more year round! Share news of the site with existing parish and school members and ask them to share with alumni they know.
  • Engage alumni ambassadors to help spread the news and get their classmates to attend homecoming.

Now that you’ve spread the word, on game day:

  • Have parish/school members staff a highly visible alumni table where attendees are encouraged to check in. Use the face-to-face greeting as a time to collect up-to-date email, phone and address information (use an ipad for quick and easy data collection) so you can add them to your ongoing communications outreach. Be sure to encourage them to join your alumni Facebook Group.  Create signage with the group name for easy reference.
  • Tap into alumni nostalgia and connection to the school.  Consider selling school spirit wear or car magnets so alumni can show their pride.  Use GiveCentral Go to collect sales on the spot!  Designate a project or program that money collected will support.
  • During halftime, make an announcement welcoming alumni and inviting them onto the field for special recognition.

In the week following homecoming, be sure to use the data you collected and send personal thank you notes to alumni who participated in homecoming activities.  Leveraging homecoming is a great way to kick-start or invigorate your alumni relations plan which should already be part of your fundraising strategy.

GiveCentral Go Fall Fundraising Tips

Fall Fundraising Tips To Boost Your Campaigns

Autumn is officially here!  As I look outside, I see the leaves slowly starting to change; turning that warm red and deep gold that signals Autumn has arrived.  

Fall is for layering and cozying up.  The same “fall rules” apply to your organization…it’s time to cozy up to donors and layer in some easy-to-organize FUNdraising activities to engage your supporters and/or raise funds to fuel your mission.  From tailgaters to Oktoberfest and Halloween parties, and everything in between, for many nonprofits fall is brimming with fundraising events.  It’s also an ideal time to prep for your year-end appeal.

Here’s some fall fundraising tips to keep in mind:

Show Donors Some Love This Fall

Making donors feel loved and helping them understand the important part they play in your mission is a key ingredient for successful fundraising.  That’s why you need to nurture donor relationships throughout the year, not just when asking for money.  Fall is the perfect time to “hunker down” and connect with donors to thank them for all they do to help your mission thrive, without asking for money.  Why not host a tailgater at your next football or soccer game?  Or, invite donors to a coffee where you share stories of the impact they are making.  These easy-to-implement activities will go a long way in showing your gratitude.  

Are you ready for some fun?

FUNdraising doesn’t have to be a chore (or a bore), it can – and should – be fun.  Fall is the perfect time to bring donors together – after being away for the summer – and there’s no better way to do that than planning a fun Fall Fest! Put your fun cap on and dream up activities that will draw donors to your event.  Remember the golden rule, you need to at least double your expenses to make any event worthwhile.  

Grab Them On The Go

One of the great things about fall is the weather and that means outdoor fundraisers.  GiveCentral Go is great for fundraising activities because you can accept payments on the spot, regardless of location.  The GiveCentral Go mobile app and card reader process payments on smartphones and tablets with the simple swipe of a credit or debit card. Funds are deposited directly into the online GiveCentral account.  Try GiveCentral Go at your fall fundraising events.

Avoid End-of-Year Pitfalls

 October is the beginning of the year-end homestretch. Our last idea of the fall fundraising tips series, is to set aside time in October to properly plan for your end-of-year appeal.  Create your fundraising plan and make sure you have the tools and team in place to make it your most successful year yet!  
A brand new season is on the horizon.  Are you ready to take it on?

Donor Giving

Generosity Varies by Time of Day – When Do Your Donors Give?

When you’re appealing to the generosity of your donors, every second counts… and when that second happens matters, too. Your donors are busy, and their time is just as valuable as their money.So what’s a nonprofit to do? Make it easy for your donors to give when it’s most convenient for them by offering online giving!GiveCentral’s recent survey of over 800 American donors told us that people are far more likely to donate in the evenings (36 percent) or on weekends (26 percent) than during the “normal” business nine-to-five. That’s a lot of generosity you might be missing if you’re not ready for off-hours giving.

(more…)

Small nonprofits get a five-star rating for their mission.

Small Nonprofits: How Do You Stack Up?

So your nonprofit isn’t as big as the United Way or Goodwill, but you’re still doing good work. But all the Big Research that you could compare your organization to is based on the big-budgeted, big-named orgs… how can small nonprofits measure up? What’s the best way to reach out to your donors in a way they’ll be receptive to? How do they prefer to give?Today we’re taking a look at another aspect of the Individual Donor Benchmark Report (IDBR), which takes a deep dive into the data of small nonprofits (anywhere from $5,000 to $500,000). And one of the biggest things they’ve discovered is that online giving presents a HUGE opportunity for you.The “Individual Donors” studied in this report generate about 36% of a nonprofit’s budget, giving an average of $435 apiece. (About half of that was “major” gifts over $1,000.) While gift size certainly varies by the size, focus, and organizational strategy of a particular nonprofit, that’s still money you want to ensure makes it into your budget.

Online Giving is Massive for Small Nonprofit

Small NonProfit

Now the big news: among nonprofits surveyed, the average growth in online fundraising between 2013 and 2014 was 403%. That’s incredible!Nonprofits with under $5,000 in online revenue are at the head of the class, with 1,083% growth in online giving from 2013 to 2014. While organizations with new online giving programs are the most likely to experience such explosive growth, even the 25% growth experienced by larger organizations is nothing to scoff at. That’s an amazing benefit to offering an online giving option to your donors!

bar graph showing the growth in the average online donation between 2013 and 2014 for four categories of small nonprofits
When your donors prefer to give online, you make sure it’s an option!

The average nonprofit is currently raising about 17% of its revenue online, and that number is growing every day. With the rate of growth mentioned above, it’s in your best interests to devote some resources to the exploration and development of an online giving program such as GiveCentral.

Recurring Donors Give More

Once you’ve got an online giving program in place, offering recurring giving options is a no-brainer. Letting your donors set up weekly, monthly, quarterly, or even annually-recurring gifts makes it incredibly easy for them to keep giving in the ways they prefer to give.  Letting them plan ahead lets you plan ahead, knowing that at least some of your revenue is essentially guaranteed. (more…)

fundraising plan

Why Your Fundraising Plan is Critical in 2016

As the development director at a “small but mighty” nonprofit, Heather Yandow was interested in data to back up her fundraising plan.But while she was looking at reports and surveys to compare her organization to, she realized that the data from many reports like GivingUSA just surveyed the big guys… where the smallest organization they surveyed had a budget of $5 million.Now, if your budget is only 10% of that and you’ve got just one part-timer working on multiple fundraising projects at once, how can you compare your success?Realizing that research and information directed toward smaller nonprofits just didn’t exist, her studio later initiated a survey that would become the Individual Donor Benchmark Report (IDBR), answering questions similar to those she’d had herself.Now in its third year, the IDBR has become a reliable resource for smaller nonprofits (meaning those with a budget under $2 million), giving you the data you need to compare yourself to organizations with similar resources as you have. With the kinds of data contained in the IBDR, you can really see where you’re doing well and where you have opportunities for growth.

We Hold These Truths

With the data collected over the past few years, theIDBR has found some universal truths that have carried over from year to year. First, the single most important thing you can do as a small nonprofit is to make a plan. The single thing that really mattered, through all the data, was whether an organization has a fundraising plan. The plan is what ties everything together, makes the data correlate, and shows you just where your money comes from… or where it could be coming from.The second universal truth demonstrated by the IDBR is that there is a HUGE opportunity in online giving. Organizations with new online giving programs have the potential for massive, almost exponential fundraising growth, and even established programs saw 25% growth from 2013 to 2014. Online giving is one more channel through which your donors can give, and you’re missing out on that stream entirely if you’re not ready to maximize online gifts.

Choose Your Own Adventure

Understanding very well how much a difference in budget can affect a nonprofit’s fundraising ability, the IDBR offers benchmarks for organizations with varying amounts of revenue. Compare your own organization, at a glance, to small (under $200K), medium (up to $499,999), large (up to $999.999), and super (up to $2 million) organizations, with a nice “average” category included for good measure. For example, the average nonprofit raises 36% of their revenue from individual donors, but the various categories range from 25% to 57%.You can compare your numbers by total dollars raised, number of gifts, and even break things down by the issue your nonprofit seeks to address. Be reassured, though… every size of organization saw double-digit percentages in revenue growth between 2013 and 2014!The IDBR also looks at fundraising strategies and challenges, including a Fundraiser’s Wish List. Unsurprisingly, the top wish was “more help for fundraising activities,” and the number 2 item was a wish for more time to spend with donors.

It’s All in the Plan

The data expert at Third Space Studio collected the survey results from 87 different nonprofits and found that the ONLY thing that really matters is whether your organization has a fundraising plan. Everything else, no matter how well-intended, was “no better than a crap shoot” without a plan. And who wants to shoot crap, anyway?Two-thirds of the organizations polled say they have a fundraising plan, and using it at least “sometimes.” And the difference between the haves and the have-nots is significant. The IDBR found that there’s no correlation between staff time and revenue, or fundraiser salary and revenue, or number of donor meetings and revenue… unless you have a plan.It’s that plan that is key to your fundraising. The survey results show that “for every $1 more you pay your primary individual donor fundraiser, you are able to rase another $4.25.” So all you need is a plan to recoup that expense more than fourfold? Yes, please!With a plan, you can expect a full-time individual donor fundraiser to bring in about $280,000. With a plan, individual donor meetings can yield over $5,000 in increased donor revenue. With a plan, you are simply able to raise more money. So what are you waiting for? Get planning!There’s so much more in the IDBR that it might be overwhelming to try to sum up in one blog post. Check back here soon for more info on recurring giving, online giving, technology, communication, and even the people who make it all happen, or visit Third Space Studio to download your own copy of the Individual Donor Benchmark Report.Happy planning!